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US Top 20 Singles: w/e July 5, 1980

US Top 20 Singles: w/e July 5, 1980

Playing tracks by

Charlie Daniels Band, Neil Sedaka & Dara Sedaka, Electric Light Orchestra, Gary Numan, Carole King and more.

Chart positions

This show was 20th in the global retro chart and 69th in the global pop chart.

A continuous mix of the top 20 US singles from Billboard's Hot 100 chart for the week ending July 5, 1980 in descending order from #20 to #1.

http://www.markbowenmixes.com/2017/07/us-top-20-singles-we-july-5-1980.html

Comments

Diagonals
Diagonals

I'm just here to say that McCarney II is the greatest McCartney album. And also I'm here to say what a fantastic mix! I was a little under three months from being born on the day this show takes pace on, but it still evoked memories in me. Awesome stuff, Mr Bowen!

Mark Bowen

I cannot argue with that! McCartney II opened my head up in ways that many Beatles albums failed to. Cheers to you, Diagonals!

Diagonals
Diagonals

I think it's also his most experimental (though Thrillington and Fireman probably beat it, those were ephemeral and not under his own name). And joyous - Temporary Secretary is delightful, and Check My Machine never ever fails to put a smile on my face. I think we've talked before of our shared love for Secret Friend. (I always wonder if McCartney took a page from Shuggie Otis, who also incorporated some interesting electronic detours into Inspiration Information.)

seventyfive

Aha! I was a bit surprised by the "Live at Glasgow" version, as this was not the one played on Dutch or UK radio at the time. Have you ever considered putting up a website/blog with background information and anecdotes like these to accompany your posts? Time consuming, I know, but so interesting to have a context to the tunes. I'm thinking of your Rock FM series too, which is rather obscure territory to me. (Sorry, just something that occurred to me, that's all.)

Mark Bowen

Ah, yes, that's a great idea - it'd be good to put some context to some of the mixes, which is one reason I really appreciate your comments (especially on this thread!).

seventyfive

That's an interesting analysis. Yes, the rockabilly thing could very well have been a reaction against new wave, which had been around since the late 70's, I guess. "Cars" had been a European hit in September '79 and "Are 'Friends' Electric?" (as Tubeway Army) in June, and there were lots of other "synthetic" acts around by then. I'd never interpreted the Billy Joel song that way, but it does make sense. And as to the #20 song: I see what you mean. Not my cup of tea either. My brother had their "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" single. But then, he liked C.W. McCall's "Convoy" too...

Mark Bowen

It's interesting, because The Stray Cats' first two albums didn't even get a US release at the time and it wasn't until a couple of years later that those 2 albums were compiled into their US debut album, and even then, they were certainly lumped into the new wave genre here. Reviewing these early 80's charts, it's obvious how hard it was to shake the conservatism, tiny breakthroughs here and there, but it's really not until '83/'84 when it opens up a bit with the so-called "2nd British Invasion". Even on this 1980 chart, I think it's notable that the more "new wavish" a-side studio version of McCartney's "Coming Up" was shunned in favor of the more traditional band sound of the b-side live version. Columbia Records in the US even had to, at the last minute, shove a bonus 7" with the live version into the McCartney II album packaging in fear of those buyers who would return it saying "hey, this isn't the version they play on the radio"!

seventyfive

And another one! "I'm Alive" into "Cars": strangely pleasing. And remarkable how you can hear the music changing: the 70's are definitely over, despite the Manhattans or the Spinners hanging in there. Had forgotten about 50's throwback Rocky Burnette. That was a thing in the early 80's, wasn't it, this nostalgic rockabilly stuff? With the Stray Cats and (in Europe) Shakin' Stevens and Matchbox. And so good to hear "Against The Wind" again.

Mark Bowen

My recollection of the times is clouded, I'm sure, but the throwback revival almost seemed like a reaction against the "new wave". Gary Numan's "Cars" seemed to simmer forever stateside. It had been out for more than half a year and had healthy airplay on the more progressive rock stations until it finally broke out in the summer on the top 40 stations that had been resisting it. Come to think of it, the Billy Joel track in this chart addresses this segregated stateside playlist atmosphere rather well, actually. If I could erase one song from this top 20, it would certainly be #20. I would have preferred to mix "The Streak" in there again, heh!