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  • 4 weeks ago
30000 Kraeuter Episode 00005 Part I - Historic Black Femmes in US Music

30000 Kraeuter Episode 00005 Part I - Historic Black Femmes in US Music

@BELP These are vinyls I collected in Germany over the last decades that feature (historic) black female artists. Its my contribution to dismantle white supremacy and whiteness itself. I am inspired by @baebaedj - a L.A. based black female DJ, who recently did a similar (and much better) show like this on an NTS slot. I am way outside my usual sound here now. This is somewhat of a debut, for me, in this area. I realise I do not have the expertise to present a fully adequate selection representing black female artists in the US at the time. If you are a female BIPoC from the US and find this attempt to be out of line or inappropriate in any way - please do let me know! I am happy to learn, I am happy for any feedback. I do not expect applause or even to be an ally, I simply would like to use my white privilege to counter eurocentrism and put a spotlight within my channels on the (historic and ongoing) struggles of marginalised groups suffering from structural racism and white supremacy.

Comments

BELP
BELP

The original NTS radio show by BAE BAE inspiring me to do this can be found here:
https://www.nts.live/shows/fupu/episodes/f-u-pay-us-21st-october-2019

BELP
BELP

As a listener you should realise that black female artists in that era were not able to fully express themselves artistically given an even stronger whitewashing and bias from a white dominant society insisting on (white) beauty standards, limiting marginalised groups in the ways they could express themselves. This is why, for instance, you will rarely (if ever) hear racial injustice to directly be spoken out in the lyrics of those songs. However, if you listen closely, you will probably hear those hidden messages, double-meanings, etc. (at least I do). Also, I have 1-2 pieces in there where black male artists use a high-pitched voice, resembling black female voices, so keeping things a bit non-binary here, but not saying those were necessarily trans women of color at the time (this is tricky, I know, pls. go shoot me if this is all too wrong). Finally, I cannot garantuee all productions are actually from the US, it could well be that some of these pieces were produced outside the US pretending to be from US for the global (western) market - my hometown Munich actually did these kind of mimicry music productions at the time too, just as a side note. Thank You.