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WHYR Jazz: Gifts & Messages 6/14/2014 Show 119

WHYR Jazz: Gifts & Messages 6/14/2014 Show 119

Chart positions

This show was 1st in the global community radio chart, 1st in the global blues chart, 1st in the global swing chart, 4th in the global radioshow chart and 8th in the global jazz chart.

A bit of everything this week, starting with Charles Earland’s take on ‘Red Clay’, Monk/Diz/Stitt/Winding with ‘Tour De Force’, and some Lucky Thompson from ‘Lucky Strikes’. Then, after a bit of Chicago hardbop from Marshall Vente, we descend to the vault for classic Basie and Django, followed by Anat Cohen (swing’s the thing!) and close hour 1 with JJ Johnson. Hour 2 starts with Joe Pass live, then a compare and contrast of Duke Pearson’s ‘Big Bertha’, as well as Michel Petrucciani with Wayne and Jim Hall backed with a Vijay Iyer track. THEN, deep into the blues with Booker Ervin/Don Patterson, and we close with a track from the latest Kevin Eubanks release. June birthdays next week………Keep the music strong!

Comments

iCazo
iCazo

Blow baby blow!
Dr. Jazz.. you really are #1 Thanks for d gift!

DrJazz
DrJazz

Thanks, my friend. Spread the word. We need to move up the jazz chart and get some 'respect'. Thanks for listening. Cheers, DrJ

niggaG0d
niggaG0d

The conversations on this week's show are lengthy... testament to the strength of this musical debate you've brought to the forefront of their attention.. Great Show and Conference MR Chairman

DrJazz
DrJazz

Yes, indeed. It was great to have all of you knowledgeable people participating is these dialogues. Hopefully, this will continue for future shows. Some of the stories told were fine! Have a good week & thanks for listening. Cheers, DrJ

DJ2tee
DJ2tee

Ha! regarding Hubbard - I suppose you could get into that argument about separating the art from the artist. I sometimes get a guilty pang when I enjoy a track by someone I don’t like as a person.

I think you would probably have to include Miles in a list of great artists but not so great human beings. But, I think possibly the art comes from that friction.

DrJazz
DrJazz

Yeh Hubbard was 'prickly'. Miles too and Wynton during his early days. Maybe it the lip pressure that alters the personality? :)

niggaG0d
niggaG0d

....I am the same way.. brother with my prejudice towards artists who's demeanors are questionable ..but very so often they contribute plausible reasoning that cause to let this guard down ... the depth to which artistry resides or is encompassed in the perplex idiosyncrasies of such greats, isn't to be understood, but appreciated ...for it is the differences that count and not very often the similarities

The Groove Point/ Halle Cat

Thanks for another great show , Dr J. Yeah, Lucky Thompson ! very very underrated. Oh and I may have to pinch JJ's "our Love is here to stay" for the next cloudcast of mine. ;-)

DrJazz
DrJazz

Agreed about LT. You can pick that tone out of a crowd. JJ doesn't get enough play, so go ahead. Email me if you need the track.

The Groove Point/ Halle Cat

thanks Doc. I found it and there's also a Lucky Thompson version as well. :-)

Kingcake
Kingcake

Gotta say that the Anat Cohen gave me a clear reminder that I am nowhere near as impressed by the 'flashing of chops' as I was as a younger man. I found myself saying 'yeah, enough already, you can play fast, so what?' Sigh... I guess I'm an old fart now. Feel free to disregard the grumpy old guy!

DrJazz
DrJazz

We need more 'old farts' around Mixcloud, in my view. These young hot dogs (G&M commentators excluded) don't know squat about jazz, in my cases. Anat can 'sing' at fast tempos, as well as more moderate ones, in contrast to a lot of the young players. So, on Anat, I'll disagree; but generally, you are on point.

Kingcake
Kingcake

Doc, you been digging around in my collection? I gotta laugh every time, 'Damn! Is he sneakin' in the house when I ain't lookin'?' Eventually you always get to someone I DON"T have (usually a more modern guy).

The Patterson/Booker and Lucky Thompson are personal favorites; has anyone ever had a more beautiful tone on soprano than Lucky? Is that vinyl I hear on that cut? Good for you! You don't want to get me started on modern remastering/mixing and the loss of dynamic range!

DrJazz
DrJazz

Agreed about LT's tone. Vinyl, yes. The more vinyl I rescue for the show, the more I can hear the difference. It's hard to digitize those overtones that give warmth to one's sound. You are only the 2nd person I know who has Hip Cake Walk (we are a select and dying breed:). That one was also from vinyl. About 25% of each show is vinyl.

It is that your house on the corner:)? Great minds have great and similar taste, yes? BTW, sorry about your Horace tribute. I got the email notification and was looking forward to it. But if such restrictions actually protect the musicians and their families, we have to go with it. I'm skeptical, however.

DrJazz
DrJazz

Loved your Basie story and my people to people interaction with Hub is consistent with yours, unfortunately.

Kingcake
Kingcake

Thanks for the sentiment Doc, y'all can email me direct @ kingcake4 54@yahoo.com for a private direct link to the Silver set, it was emotionally expensive to make and I hate to waste it entirely. Got a few tears invested in that one.

Kingcake
Kingcake

oops, that's kingcake54@yahoo.com

poppachubby

I really like Wycliffe Gordon as far as modern voices go. Doc, I avoid the debates but that doesn't mean that I don't feel exactly as you do. I post at a music forum where at least once a month I am treated to all of the reasons Steely Dan or Frank Zappa are jazz artists. Most recently a fellow tried to convince us that modern DJs (turntablists) are basically the modern day versions of great jazz masters.

As much as all of this makes me ill with disagreement, nothing good comes from debating - particularily when its a jazz fan vs a jazz fan. This is why I choose not to debate, but believe me, I am with you.

DrJazz
DrJazz

Yeh, I feel your pain. Some people think that any instrumental track is jazz. And just because some pop star uses jazz musicians, it's jazz...That makes the Rolling Stones a jazz group because they used Sonny Rollins on a couple of tracks. (please, just kidding!)...

On trombone, I enjoy Wycliffe, also Luis Bonilla, Ray Anderson, Frank Lacy (never properly recorded), and others. Younger cat to check out is Michael Dease.

Thanks to all of you (KC, PC, DJ2T, TLC, Halle) for making this such a lively 'spot on the dial' this week. Enjoyed all your comments and the interaction. Cheers, DrJ

DJ2tee
DJ2tee

Personally speaking I like a lot of the younger players, but I can see Hub’s point.

DrJazz
DrJazz

I like to listen too and find lots of 'interesting' stuff, but it rarely moves me to open my wallet. I end up buying individual tracks mostly, rather than whole albums. One guy that has my attention (just to name one) is Etienne Charles. Thanks for your comments, as always. Cheers, DrJ

DJ2tee
DJ2tee

Quoting Hub: "They’ve had no real experience with the real essence of those guys -- the way they help their instruments, the way they acted, what really caused this music. Most of the cats trying to play hardcore contemporary jazz don't have their own style. Or there are some people like Wynton [Marsalis] who play the horn, but don't play no hip jazz. They're just into playing the instrument good. They're not creating ideas."

Still Hubbard has words of praise for younger players like Vincent Herring, who "reminds me a lot of Cannonball. He's got that cheerful type of feeling in his playing. He's on of the few young cats on the scene today that has his own voice. A lot of the kids are just copying what we did in the ' 50s and '60s, so there are very few guys I see today who will be considered innovators."

Kingcake
Kingcake

I'm going to try to tread as lightly as I can here because people get passionate about these things, but I am always left squirming uncomfortably when encountering excessive 'Freddie love'. I find it very hard to separate the admittedly fine horn player from the utterly dreadful man. In 2 separate experiences 20 years and 1000 miles apart, he was an arrogant, nasty man, full of cocaine, Crown Royal and himself. The worst moment came here in New Orleans at Rozy's where he castigated and fired the great Hadley Caliman ONSTAGE and announce he would be auditioning sax players the following night. He left town with poor Rudy Johnson from Ray Charles' band and everyone felt sorry for RUDY!

Kingcake
Kingcake

P.S. I promise never to mention Freddie again and spoil the fun. My experience doesn't need to color that of everyone else.

poppachubby

Just a fun and harmless question, kind of like Beatles vs Elvis. I am not big on divisive jazz debate such as "what qualifies as jazz" "swing or not" etc, etc.

DrJazz
DrJazz

I try really hard to just differentiate between good and bad, a la Ellington. But man, it really burns me when pop is marketed as jazz (e.g. Glasper's Black Radio sides, which I HAVE listened to carefully several times, as well as seen the band in person).